Posts

Another development group has filed plans for a mixed-use hotel in Wynwood near the popular Wynwood Walls.

111 Wynwood LLC filed plans for a five-story, 72-key hotel at 111 Northwest 26th Street. Developers Eduardo Vargas and Andres Hogg plan to break ground on the 50,000-square-foot project early next year and open in 2020, Vargas said.

Alain Bartroli is the architect of record, and Richter Dahl Rocha is designing the facade. The construction cost is expected to total about $8 million, Vargas added.

It will also have a mix of retail and restaurant space on the ground floor, co-working space, and a rooftop pool, bar and restaurant. Hotel amenities will include rooms with smart features and kitchenettes, valet parking and laundry services. Read More here: The Real Deal Miami

A Miami Beach property owner is accusing the city of engaging in discriminatory practices when it comes to cracking down on short-term rentals.

Natalie Nichols filed a civil rights lawsuit in Miami-Dade Circuit Court on Wednesday, alleging the city’s practice of levying five-figure fines on some residents who list their properties on Airbnb and other home-sharing websites violates the Florida Constitution.

Nichols wants a permanent injunction that would prevent the city from fining property owners like her who want to offer short-term rentals. “I feel strongly that this is a violation of my constitutional rights,” she said. “There is a silent majority in Miami Beach that want short-term rentals. But people are afraid to come forward.”

Nichols’ complaint hinges on an exception the city carved out for a section of North Beach. Specifically, properties fronting Harding Avenue from 73rd to 87th streets, including buildings east of Harding and an alley on the west side of the avenue, the lawsuit states.

In October 2016 — ten months after the city raised short-term rental fines from $1,000 a day to $20,000 for the first offense — Miami Beach made it legal for owners of historic buildings along Harding to offer short-term rentals. Preservationists and developers supported the measure, believing it would motivate property owners to renovate and maintain old buildings.

Read more here:The Real Deal